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Coffee Farmers Alliance Tanzania

Productivity across small-scale farming systems in Tanzania is too low to provide adequate income, food security or future on-farm investment opportunities. The major challenges for the local coffee growers are climate change, sinking levels of nutrients in the soil, a lack of access to up-to-date information and agricultural support services related to enhancing the quantity and quality of crops produced. Furthermore, there is a scarcity of professional and well-managed farmer organizations that could benefit of existing market opportunities necessary to explore opportunities for raising efficiency and adding value. At the same time, farmers lack the requisite entrepreneurial and agricultural skills and knowledge required to move from subsistence farming to commercial levels.

 

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“If, in God’s will, I will be present in the years to come, it is my hope that I will do many great things with the knowledge and skills that I have acquired through the project.”

JIMMY KALONGA, FARMER


Against this background, the project “Coffee Farmer Alliances Tanzania” (CFAT) is implemented in the northern regions of the country, in Arusha and Kilimanjaro, as well as in the southern region of Mbeya.

What are we aiming at?

With the objective of improving farmers’ livelihoods, a focus is put on the increase of on-farm income, achieved by strengthening agricultural production. Through adaptation of good agricultural practices, farmers could increase their coffee yields by 60%, from 250 kg to 400 kg of clean coffee/hectare. At the same time, the establishment of well-managed commercially oriented and farmer owned farmer organizations capable of providing essential services to their members is facilitated by the project. These farmer organizations act as partners in the development process and gradually take up the role provided by the project to ensure long-term sustainability. The project puts the farmer and his family as well as the farmer organizations at the center of the development processes. The farmers’ commitment and ownership are essential to effectively and efficiently achieve long-term systemic improvements and change.

Conservation Agriculture: The Key To Food Security

Diversification and adoption of climate resilient conservation agriculture practices: next to coffee, we encourage farmers to diversify their income and stabilize their food security by planting other crops next to coffee. Through the conservation farming practices, farmers have increased their maize yields by up to 120%. These practices encompass minimum tillage, timely and precise planting, crop rotation, no burning of residues, and accurate weed control.

Establishing Organizational Structures and Networks

The improved business relationships to processing companies and better market linkages have also enabled farmers selling through the newly founded organizational structures. In this way, they were able to realize an average net value addition for coffee of 40%, (2014/15 season). This translated into adopting beneficiaries having achieved a per capita income exceeding USD 2 a day from coffee.

Beneficiaries of this program have been linked to a large network of service providers, including commercial banks and input suppliers. Through their primary, secondary and third tier organizational structures, farmers were able to acquire loans from commercial banks, organize bulk purchase input supply and engage in internal saving schemes to create capital funds.

Gender and Youth: We Implement a Holistic Approach

The projects promotes participation and joint decision making of all members of a household to equitably benefit from cash and food crop production and marketing. This includes supporting young people to gain skills in important value chains and agricultural growth sectors to find meaningful employment in more modernized, dynamic, productive and profitable agriculture.

In order to achieve these results, the program focuses on various components. The main ones are: organizational and business development, sustainable coffee production, marketing and service linkages for coffee as well as food crops, food security and income diversification, climate change, gender, and youth.

Local Partners

ACCOUNTABILITY FOR TANZANIA (ACT)

COFFEE PARTNERSHIP TANZANIA (CPT)

DISTRICT COUNCILS

TANZANIAN COFFEE BOARD (TCB)

TANZANIA COFFEE FARMERS ALLIANCE (TCFA)

TANZANIA COFFEE RESEARCH INSTITUTE (TACRI)

International Partners

AUSTRIAN DEVELOPMENT AGENCY (ADA)

COFFEE KIDS

CONSERVATION AGRICULTURE REGIONAL PROGRAM (CARP)

FINANCIAL INSTITUTIONS (NMB, CRDB, KCBL)

INITIATIVE FOR COFFEE & CLIMATE (C&C)

LAVAZZA FOUNDATION

RABOBANK

SWEDISH INTERNATIONAL DEVELOPMENT COOPERATION AGENCY (SIDA)

Location


Quick Facts
Coffee Farmers Alliance Tanzania
Tanzania
12,000 coffee farmers in southern Tanzania representing with their families about 60,000 people in total have improved the production systems within 5 years in order to exceed the poverty line of USD 1.0 per person per day in a sustainable way (up-scaling to 25,000 beneficiaries in southern and northern Tanzania representing 125,000 people).

BENEFICIARIES:
25,000 (north and south)

DURATION:
2015 - 2019

PROJECT STATUS:
running


Further Information:
1503 ICP Tanzania - Annual Report (PDF) 1507 ICP Tanzania - Project Progress Report (PDF) 1604 ICP Tanzania - Annual Report (PDF) 1610 ICP Tanzania - Project Progress Report (PDF)
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